Susan Y Jainchill RLA, AICP - Founding Principal

 
 

For over 25 years Susan Jainchill has played significant roles in landscape architectural and urban planning projects throughout the New York metropolitan region, often leading teams of engineers, architects and natural resource professionals through design documentation and construction implementation on difficult sites and always aspiring to create beautiful places to live, work and play.

Susan finds and leverages opportunities to capture unrealized value in every project, regardless of its scope or scale.  As both a licensed landscape architect (RLA) and certified planner (AICP), she applies a cross-disciplinary perspective to navigating regulatory requirements and municipal approvals processes.  On large projects such as corporate campus master plans, public recreation facilities or the landscape restoration at infrastructure improvements, and on smaller projects on the scale of an individual residential lot, a green roof, or a pocket park, Susan brings well-honed analytical skills, proven design talents and specialized visual communication tools to produce aesthetically appealing, practical, and cost-effective solutions.

Susan is a resident of the Village of Ardsley in Westchester, New York where she sits on the Village Planning Board and is the Vice President of the Westchester County Historical Society.  She recently founded Aspect 120 Landscape Architecture P.C. after completing 10 years as the Technical Director of AKRF's Landscape Planning and Design Service Group.  Susan earned her Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture at Cornell University and Master of Urban Planning at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.  She was a Lady Davis Fellow at Technion, Israel Institute of Technology and is a frequent guest lecturer at Fordham University in New York City.

 
 
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Since you asked…

  • The word ‘Aspect’ refers to the point-of-view or the perspective the designer assumes when approaching a project challenge.

  • The number 120 represents an obtuse angle that creates 1/3 of a circle.

  • A 120 degree angle has inherent structural strength in the lifting of loads (by rope).

  • A 120 degree angle the shape of a person’s cone of vision when experiencing a landscape

  • The number 120 is symbolically auspicious in that it represents ‘a full life’ in the Jewish tradition.



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